A Time for Mothers.


The monsoon is High Spring for a lot of spiders and critters in India, odd as that may sound. You start seeing spiders in different stages of their life cycle, and you get snapshots of how things are in the whole birth-growth-death cycle.

Here’s a hunting spider, an Oxyopes spp. (brown, in contrast to their green cousins). When it’s their time of the year, the gravid female spiders cleverly weave silk strands along the length of a leaf tip, forcing the leaf to curl down and provide a nice little nook to store their eggs in. [“Gravid” is a fancy way of saying pregnant, when it comes to spiders. ]

Hunting spider with

I’ve mentioned before that hunting spiders are rangers, and they can lope quite fast on their long legs and stalk prey. However, once the female lays eggs, they sit themselves either on or close to the egg sac, protectively guarding it. It was the same this year as the last.

I’m not entirely sure how long the whole hatching process takes place, but spider growth is slightly different hatching chickens. Even after hatching, some spiderlings spend a few days within the egg sac/web, finishing a molt or two before they feel ready to leave and wander off. In the photo below you can see the first few spiderlings emerging from the nest.

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I’m guessing here, but I think the mother provides a few “stock” silk lines to a few nearby locations, and the spiderlings do the rest: they start producing their own webs and strands very early, and scamper off in different directions.

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Here’s a close up of the spiderlings. This is as much resolution I can get in the “wild” on my camera, I’m afraid.

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To the naive observer (i.e. moi) it’s interesting how spider mothers take on a very protective mantle: guarding the nest from marauding insects and the like, but they don’t really coddle the hatchlings at all, they’re left to figure things out on their own. I’m really curious to know how freshly hatched spiders “learn” how to spin webs and strands.

Continue reading “A Time for Mothers.”

A Time for Mothers.

None shall pass.


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Remember the Green Lynx spider from before? Today’s critter is its close cousin, the Oxyopes, or the Lynx spider. Red or brown in colour instead of green, these critters are a bit smaller in size, and perhaps a bit more aggressive.

Here you see the maternal streak amongst spiders, with the mother sitting squarely on top of a set of unhatched eggs. Lynx spiders are hunting spiders, so they don’t go about building fancy webs or have elaborate escape plans. They hunt, attack and perhaps execute a strategic retreat when required.

Continue reading “None shall pass.”

None shall pass.